Baby Lock Support

Glossary

Terms

alter

To change or revise a garment or pattern to suit individual sizing or desires. This could be making an item larger or smaller, adding darts, lengthening a bodice, etc.

applique

A decorative technique done by cutting shaped pieces from other fabrics and applying it to the main fabric with a satin or decorative stitch.

armscye

Refers to the curved opening for a sleeve.

awl

Tool with pointed tip used to push out corners when fabric is turned (for example, when making a collar). Can also be called a stiletto.

back stitch

Sewing a few stitches forward, then sewing a few stitches in reverse to lock in the stitches at the beginning or ending of a seam. Also called back-tacking.

backing

Generally a quilting term that defines the fabric used as the back layer of the quilt. Can also be used to describe the layer of fabric used inside projects like wearable art vest.

ballpoint needle

Ballpoint needles are designed to penetrate knit fabrics without nicking or damaging the fabric.

bar tack

Threads sewn in a small line used for reinforcement at points of stress, such as pockets.

baste

Large stitches used to temporarily hold fabric together which are easily removed.

batting

Fiberfill, cotton, wool, or other material that is flattened and usually on a roll, purchased in precut lengths or by the yard. Uses of batting range from filling for placemats or vests to quilts. Simply, batting is the "fluff" inside the quilt or garment.

bias

Runs diagonally to the straight grain of the fabric. This is the stretchiest part of the fabric.

bias binding

Strips of fabric cut on the bias used to bind or cover an edge.

bias tape

Strips of fabric which is cut from the bias of the fabric and is folded on two edges for edging.

binding

Encasing the raw edges of a blanket or quilt with another piece of fabric. Binding also refers to the fabric that is folded and used for the encasing of the raw edges.

blindhem

A machine stitch used in hemming garments.

bobbin

The small spool that holds thread for the lower portion of a sewing machine.

bobbin case

The portion of the machine that holds the bobbin.

bodice

The top of a garment from the shoulder to the waist.

bodkin

A tool used to pull elastic through an opening or casing.

boning

Narrow nylon or plastic strips used to create structure and shape in fitted garments.

calico

A small repeated print design on cotton, usually a floral.

casing

Garment edge or opening where the fabric is folded over like a hem, but gathered with a drawstring or elastic running through it, commonly found at necklines, waistbands, and cuffs.

chalk

Chalk is used to temporarily mark alignment points on fabric.

chalk

Chalk is a traditional material for marking cloth and can be brushed away when finished with. Chalk comes in triangular pieces, rollers, and pencils in various colors. Keep the edges or points sharp, mark on the wrong side of the fabric, and use a color which shows up well. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

charmeuse

A lightweight woven fabric that drapes well, making it suitable for scareves, blouses and lingerie. Look for patterns that are loose and flowing or have soft gathers. Avoid patterns with pleats, as charmeuse is too lightweight to hold folds. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

china silk

A lightweight fabric that contains sheen and has a plain weave. It\'s relatively inexpensive and is commonly dyed using pastel colors. China silk is often used when making lightweight blouses, scarves and lining. Don\'t use it when making fitted garments, as the seams easily tear from wear. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

closure

Buttons, zippers, snaps that hold a garment closed.

couching

Securing cord, heavy threads, or other narrow trims to a background fabric with stitching

craft knife

A small, sharp blade used with care is a useful tool for cutting leather and fur. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

crepe de chine

A lightweight fabric that has a pebbly appearance on the right and wrong side. It drapes well, making it perfect for loose blouses, dresses and skirts. Crepe de Chine doesn\'t ravel as easily as some other silks, but it still needs to be handled with care to prevent tears. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

cutting mat

A special self healing mat for use with a ruler and rotary cutter, similar to the way you would use a kitchen cutting board with a knife. Cutting mats come with printed measurements and angle guidelines.

darning

The weaving of thread or yarn across a hole in a piece of fabric to fill and conceal the hole. You can also darn across a thin or worn area of fabric to strengthen it, to prevent a hole from forming, and to close a fabric tear. The editors of SINGER Worldwide. Mending and Repari, 2007, page 24.

darning foot

A sewing machine foot that is used for free motion quilting.

darts

Darts are functional tucks in garment construction used to add shape to a flat fabric most often found at the bust, back, waist and hip.

directional prints

Fabrics printed with distinct design that has a top and bottom. Cutting or sewing a directional print incorrectly would result in the motif being upside-down in the finished item.

doupioni

A shimmering silk that seems to change colors as it moves into different lights. Doupioni works well for making semi-tailored garments, such as evening gowns, as it holds gathers and pleats. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

dry iron

A dry iron can be used in conjunction with a damp cloth or water bottle spray when required. Some fabrics are damaged by water spots leaving permanent marks on the cloth. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

ease

  1. Making one piece of fabric fit to another by evenly pulling the fabric with out making any gathers or tucks. 2. The allowance added to a body measurement to make a garment wearable.

edge stitch

Top stitching very close to the edge usually a zigzag stitch.

eyelet

A small hole in the fabric that is found as a decorative element on lace or on a garment in rows laced with cord.

fade-away pens

The ink from these pens (normally pink) will fade from the fabric within 48 hours. Check the pen on a scrap of fabric first to see whether it shows up on the chosen cloth and then disappears. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

fat eighth

An 1/8 yard piece of 44/45" fabric cut in a non-traditional configuration. Traditionally an 1/8 yard would measure 4-1/2" x 44". However, a "fat" eighth measures 9" x 22".

fat quarter

A 1/4 yard piece of 44/45"-wide fabric that is cut in a non-traditional configuration. A traditional 1/4 yard cut would measure 9" x 44". However, a "fat" quarter typically measures 18" x 22".

feed dogs

Sometimes also called feed teeth, tiny metal rows that are under the foot of the machine that pull and feed the fabric through the machine.

finger pressing

Pressing a crease or a seam allowance open using your fingers instead of an iron.

flagging

The up and down motion of the material with the needle that is caused by improper hooping, the presser foot not being properly adjusted (too much clearance with needle plate), and improper fabric stabilization (incorrect backing). Named because of its resemblance to a waving flag. Flagging generally causes improper needle loop formation that can lead to skipped stitches and thread breakage. Flagging can also negatively impact the appearance of the finished product resulting in poor design registration.

flat felled seam

A very durable seam, usually seen on jeans.

fussy-cutting

Fabric with a pattern can be perfect for showcasing a particular print. To make it stand-out you could "fussy-cut" certain pieces of the fabric. When doing this, you are isolating and cutting out a specific motif or print. For example, you may want a specific flower in a floral print to be the center of a canvas bag.

gather

Bunching or pulling up fabric together to create fullness.

grain

The lengthwise and crosswise threads of a woven fabric.

grosgrain

Fabric or ribbon made with heavy horizontal ribs, most often seen as ribbon.

handwheel

Often also called the fly wheel, this is the round knob on the side of the machine that moves as the needle goes up and down.

hem gauge

A six inch ruler with an adjustable slider for marking hems.

hook and eye

Fasteners for clothing which have a metal hook that hooks into a loop (eye) to close.

hook and loop tape

A type of closure that is made of two sides. One side has hooks and the other loops that stick to each other when closed. Common brand name for hook and loop tape is Velcro.

inseam

The seam or measurement between the crotch and the hemline on pants.

interfacing

A special layer of fabric added to certain areas of a garment to add shape or stiffness to a garment. It is often used in collars, cuffs, and behind buttonholes. It is available in white and black and can be a sew-in or iron on type.

inverted pleat

Pair of mirror-image knife pleats folded toward each other. An inverted pleat folded into an opening at the lower end ofthe center back seam of a straight skirt is also known as a kick pleat.

jacquard

A type of loom which can create intricate designs through operating the threads independently.

knife pleats

Also known asstraight pleats, all face the same direction and the same distance apart. Typically seen on school "name"

koskin

The Swedish word for "cow\'s skin". But, it\'s not real leather, it\'s a faux leather that looks and feels like real leather. It\'s commonly used for CD and laptop cases.

lace

A delicate, unique fabric of flowers or motifs created on a net.

lining

A second layer of fabric that completely covers the inside of a garment.

lockstitch

The name used for a stitch that is formed with a needle and bobbin thread. The needle thread is interlocked with the bobbin thread to form a stitch.On apparel sewing applications other than embroidery, a well-balanced lockstitch will use the same amount of needle thread as bobbin thread. On embroidery applications, this is not true because you never want to see the bobbin thread on the topside of the sewn product. Therefore the needle thread is held on the underneath side by the bobbin thread.

measurement gauge

This handy gadget allows small measurements to be checked easily. it is marked on both sides and is easy to manipulate when folding up hems, marking buttonholes, and positioning top stitching. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

mercerization

A treatment applied to cotton to give it strength and luster.

miter

Method of neatly folding hems or flat trims so that they form a precise diagonal corner.

muslin

A plain, un-dyed cotton fabric, available bleached or unbleached.

nap

The raised, fluffy or hairy surface on some fabrics that sometimes requires it to be cut all in a certain way.

needles

Thin metal piece that pulls the thread through the fabric. Needles come in different types ballpoint needles have a rounded point and are used for knits so it does not snag or pull the fabric. Sharps have a very pointed tip and are used for woven fabrics.

needlework/embroidery scissors

Scissors with short blades and sharp points are very useful. The sharp points can be used for cutting individual stitches or for getting into difficult to access corners for trimming. Use them for cutting threads and also for cutting the backing of synthetic fur fabric to avoid cutting the fibers. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

noil

Relatively inexpensive. Use it when making pants, skirts, shorts, jackets and vests. Noil and raw silk are often used interchangeably; however, as raw silk is stiff, dull and attracts odor and dirt, it\'s typically used for items that don\'t require flexibility or have resistance to wear, such as silk fabrics. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

notches

Markings on patterns used for matching.

notions

Items other than fabrics required to complete a project, such as buttons, thread, zippers etc.

novelty print

A novelty print, or conversation print, are fabrics printed with a theme motif that could represent the holidays, sports, hobbies, nursery rhymes, etc.

organdie

A sheer crisp, plain, weave cloth made from very fine cotton yarns woven to produce a smooth and fine fabric. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

organza

Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk..Today, many organzasare also available in nylon and polyester. Typically this fabric is used for brialware or eveningwear, effects in the bedroom and between rooms.

overlock stitch

Machine overcast stitch that encloses a raw edge to prevent fraying

overlocker

Machine used for finishing the raw edges of seams -- trimming and overcasting the edge and sewing, all in one action. Baby Lockas a wide variety of quality overlocking or serging machines.

paper scissors

It is essential to have a pair of scissors kept just for paper. Using fabric shears for cutting paper patterns will cause them to become blunt and useless for their intended purpose. The do not need sharp points but must cut paper cleanly. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

pattern layout

Direction on how the pattern pieces should be cut from the fabric.

pinking shears

Special scissors with a zigzag edge used to prevent fraying on edges.

pinking shears

Pinking shears have notched teeth which leave a zigzag edge to the cut cloth. This makes the fabric less likely to ravel. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

pins

The most common method for holding your fabric in place.

pivoting

Turning the fabric with the machine needle in it and the presser foot up.

pleather

A faux leather commonly made from a blend of cotton and polyurethane, which allows it to breathe and withstand dry cleaning. Available in a variety of textures, colors and weights.

preshrinking

Washing the fabric before you begin cutting so the fabric can shrink first.

presser feet

The part of the machine that holds the fabric down while sewing and can be changed for different techniques.

pressing cloths

Pieces of cotton muslin and silk organza are perfect to protect the surface of fabric from the heat of the iron. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

puckering

Result of the fabric being gathered by the stitches. Causes include incorrect density, loose hooping, insufficient backing, or incorrect thread tensions.

push and pull compensation

A degree of distortion built into a design by the digitizer to compensate for the push or pull on the fabric caused by the embroidery stitches. This can help prevent a digitized circle from looking like an egg shape when sewn out. Generally, it is necessary to extend horizontal elements and reduce vertical elements.

quick un-pick

A quick un-pick is useful when removing stitching. Cut every third stitch on one side, then turn the seam over and pull out the thread from the other side. Use it to open buttonholes: place a pin across one end and cut from the other end up to the pin. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007

quick zipper

A lapped method where one side of the fabric covers the teeth, it is very easy to get a neat result as the visible stitching is made on flat fabric before the zipper is in place. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

raw edge

The unfinished edge of a fabric or a garment.

registration

Correct registration is achieved when all stitches and design elements line up correctly. Poor registration can occur when the product being embroidered had not been hooped properly, improper digitizing, and excessive flagging.

remnant

A leftover piece of fabric.

ribbing

Stretchy knit bands found on t-shirts and sweatshirts at the waist, wrist, and neck.

right side

The good side of a fabric that would face out.

Rolled Hem

A rolled hem is a vary narrow hem - much more narrowthan what you would get by turning, pressing and stitching. These tiny hems are seen on napkins, the edge of ruffles, tableclothes, linings and scarves. You can achive a rolled hem with the Lauren with a 3-thread set-up or by using a rolled hem foot on your sewing machine.

rolled hem

A small hem that the fabric rolls over and the edge is covered with thread.

rotary cutter

A circular cutting tool for fabric that looks similar to a pizza cutter yet is very sharp. It is used with a self-healing type cutting mat.

rotary cutter and mat

A rotary cutter is very useful for cutting out small to medium sized pieces of fabric. It must be used in conjunction with a self healing mat to protect both the working surface and the rotary blade. Buy the largest mat available and replace the rotary blades when necessary. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

running stitch

A basic hand sewn stitch that looks like a dashed line.

satin stitch

Zigzag stitch sewn with a very short stitch length usually used in appliqué.

seam allowance

The area of fabric that is between the stitching (seam) and the cut edge.

seam ripper

A tool that has a curved, sharp cutting area used to rip out or remove sewn stitches.

seams

The stitching that joins fabric.

selvage

The edge of fabric that does not fray. It usually has small holes and fabric manufacturer’s information on it.

serger

Also known as an overlock machine, it seams and finishes in one step for professional results.

serrated shears

These are occasionally useful if cutting thin, lightweight, soft fabric as the blades grip the fabric better and so it does not “run away” from the blades. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007

shantung

A heavyweight fabric that\'s made from cultivated warp yarns and heavyweight doupioni yarns. It can be lustrous or dull, depending on the yarn. Shantung holds gathers and pleats, making it sutiable for fitted garments. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

shears

Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007. Sharp, long bladed scissors are ideal for cutting fabric quickly and with a smooth edge. Use these when cutting out fabric pieces, and cut drape lengths with long sweeping cuts. Make sure they are comfortable.

shirring

Decorative technique obtained by making multiple rows of gathering.

stabilizer

A backing used to support embroidery work. It comes in a variety of types, weights and colors and can be temporary or permanent to the garment.

stay-stitching

Stitching done inside the seam allowance, before construction, to stabilize curves or edges.

steam iron

A steam iron contains a small tank of water and pushes steam through the cloth whilst ironing to improve its efficiency. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

stitch in the ditch

Sewing on the right side directly through a previous seam to hold something like the seam allowance down.

straight stitch

The basic machine sewn stitch used for seams in garments.

tank iron

A tank iron has a large reservoir of water connected by a pip to the iron. This type of iron produces a greater pressure of steam. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

tape measure

A device used to measure the length and width of material

tension

The amount of pull or tautness on thread controlled by the machines tension assembly. Usually adjusted automatically or by turning a dial.

thimble

A leather, metal or plastic piece used to cover and protect the end of your finger when pushing a hand needle through fabric repeatedly.

tussah

Produced from cocoons of wild tussah silkworms that eat oak and juniper leaves. It\'s most commonly available in its natural color (a creamy tan) becuase it\'s difficult to dye. Tussah works well for travel garments because it\'s wrinkle resistant. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

tussah

Produced from cocoons of wild tussah silkworms that eat oak and juniper leaves. It\'s most commonly available in its natural color (a creamy tan) becuase it\'s difficult to dye. Tussah works well for travel garments because it\'s wrinkle resistant. Barnabee, Sue. Creative Machine Embroidery, July/August, 2010, page 18.

underlay stitches

Stitches in a design that are put down before the design stitches; used to stabilize the fabric or raise the design so that the fine detailing is not lost.

upholstery fabric

There are many varieties of upholstery fabric but it is always strong, tough, and hard wearing, which makes it difficult to sew. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

velour

It is the knitted equivalent of velvet. It has a thick soft pile with a surface sheen. It looks like velvet buy has more drape due to its knitted construction. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

vent

Applies to garment sewing. A lined opening allowing for movement when the garment is worn.

wash-away pens

The ink from these pens (normally blue) can be wiped off with a damp cloth when finished with. It is advisable to try it out on a scrap of fabric first to check that the wetting doesn’t damage it. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

weft

The threads making up the filling yarns of a woven cloth.

whip stitch

A hand sewn stitch in which the needle goes through the edge of a fabric from the same side and covers the edge of fabric with thread.

wrong side

The inside of a fabric or garment.

yard (meter) stick

Made of wood or metal, a stick is ideal for measuring lengths of fabric from a roll. The stable nature of a yard (meter) stick is also helpful when cutting fabric fro drapes or shades. Knight , Lorna. The Sewing Stitch and Textile Bible An illustrated guide to techniques and materials. Iola, Wi: Krause Publications, 2007.

yardage requirement

The amount of fabric needed to complete a project.

yardstick

Measuring device of wood or metal 36" long.

zigzag

A sewing machine stitch that moves back and forth in a Z formation.

zipper

Fastener consisting of two rows of metal, plastic, or nylon teeth on strips of twill tao and a slide that draws the teeth together to close an opening.

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